The  Agenda of Anti-Fascist Groups in The United States

George HegelAnti-fascist groups in the United States are political positions or activities that accept or support social equality, often in opposition to social hierarchy and social inequality.  They typically involve concern for those in society who are perceived as disadvantaged relative to others and a belief that there are unjustified inequalities that need to be reduced or abolished.

Carl MarxThe political terms Left and Right were first coined during the French Revolution (1789–1799), referring to the seating arrangement in the Estates General: those who sat on the left generally opposed the monarchy and supported the revolution, including the creation of a republic and secularization, while those on the right were supportive of the traditional institutions of the Old Regime. Use of the term "Left" became more prominent after the restoration of the French monarchy in 1815 when it was applied to the "Independents".  The word "wing" was appended to Left and Right in the late 19th century, usually with disparaging intent, and "left-wing" was applied to those who were unorthodox in their religious or political views.

Friedrich EngelsThe term was later applied to a number of movements, especially republicanism during the French Revolution in the 18th century, followed by socialism, communism and anarchism in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Since then, the term left-wing has been applied to a broad range of movements including civil rights movements, feminist movements, anti-war movements, and environmental movements, as well as a wide range of parties.