Facts About The American Buffalo in Virginia

Note: The range of the Buffalo is fairly large but they may or may not be in Virginia.  If you are traveling to the western range of the Buffalo from Virginia, this information is provided for better understanding of this animal.

Rocky Mountain BuffaloIf bison reside in Virginia, they are the largest mammal and males can weigh up to 2,000 pounds and stand 6 feet tall.  The Yellowstone herd is the only location where bison have continuously lived since prehistoric times.  These herds are considered the only “pure” strain that roam the country’s grasslands and as of 2015, the population of the Yellowstone herd is estimated at 4,900 making it the largest in the country.

You can somewhat judge a bison’s mood by what’s going on with its tail.  When calm, the tail hangs down and switches naturally.  Although you can never trust the mood of a bison, when that tail is straight up, it’s time to stand back and get out of its way as it may be ready to charge.

The bison can live up to 20 years with an average between 10 and 20 years.  The cows begin breeding after 2 years, the bulls after 6 years.  All bison love to wallow in the dirt but the males perform this task during mating season to leave their scent and display their strength.

Bison Butting HeadsThe ancestry can be traced back to southern Asia thousands of years ago but made their way to America crossing the land bridge connecting Asia with North America hundreds of thousands of years ago.  Then, these bison were much larger and fossil records show that a prehistoric bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

The American bison's ancestors can be traced to southern Asia thousands of years ago. Bison made their way to America, and near Virginia, by crossing the ancient land bridge that once connected Asia with North America during the Pliocene Epoch, some 400,000 years ago. These ancient animals were much larger than the iconic bison we love today. Fossil records show that one prehistoric bison, Bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

While bison have poor eyesight, they have excellent senses of smell and hearing. Cows and calves communicate using pig-like grunts, and during mating season, bulls can be heard bellowing across long distances.

The Region and Landscape Of Virginia

VirginiaVirginia is located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Virginia is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first colonial possession established in mainland British America and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2014 is over 8.3 million.

The area's history begins with several indigenous groups, including the Powhatan. In 1607 the London Company established the Colony of Virginia as the first permanent New World English colony. Slave labor and the land acquired from displaced Native American tribes each played a significant role in the colony's early politics and plantation economy. Virginia was one of the 13 Colonies in the American Revolution and joined the Confederacy in the American Civil War, during which Richmond was made the Confederate capital and Virginia's northwestern counties seceded to form the state of West Virginia. Although the Commonwealth was under one-party rule for nearly a century following Reconstruction, both major national parties are competitive in modern Virginia.

The Geography of Virginia

Presidents Park VirginiaVirginia has a total area of 42,774.2 square miles (110,784.7 km2), including 3,180.13 square miles (8,236.5 km2) of water, making it the 35th-largest state by area.  Virginia is bordered by Maryland and Washington, D.C. to the north and east; by the Atlantic Ocean to the east; by North Carolina to the south; by Tennessee to the southwest; by Kentucky to the west; and by West Virginia to the north and west. Virginia's boundary with Maryland and Washington, D.C. extends to the low-water mark of the south shore of the Potomac River.  The southern border is defined as the 36° 30′ parallel north, though surveyor error led to deviations of as much as three arcminutes.  The border with Tennessee was not settled until 1893, when their dispute was brought to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Best Fishing Spots in Virginia

Lake Moomaw
Brown Trout

Virginia BeachThe New River
Smallmouth Bass

Mossy Creek
Brown Trout

Briery Creek Lake
Largemouth Bass

Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge
White Perch

Upper Rappahannock River
Redbreast Sunfish

Laurel Bed Lake
Smallmouth Bass

Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel
Striped Bass and Croaker
 
Lake Frederick
Largemouth Bass, Bluegill, Redear Sunfish and Channel Catfish

Gloucester Point
Croaker

Claytor Lake
Bass, Catfish, Muskie and Walleye

James River at the Dutch Gap
Bass (Smallmouth, Largemouth, Striped) and Blue Catfish and Shad

The Jackson River at Gaithright Dam
Trout

John H. Kerr Reservoir
Striped Bass, Crappie and White Perch

Smith Mountain Lake
Largemouth Bass

Windmill Point
Bluefish

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