Facts About The American Buffalo in Louisiana

Note: The range of the Buffalo is fairly large but they may or may not be in Louisiana.  If you are traveling to the western range of the Buffalo from Louisiana, this information is provided for better understanding of this animal.

Rocky Mountain BuffaloIf bison reside in Louisiana, they are the largest mammal and males can weigh up to 2,000 pounds and stand 6 feet tall.  The Yellowstone herd is the only location where bison have continuously lived since prehistoric times.  These herds are considered the only “pure” strain that roam the country’s grasslands and as of 2015, the population of the Yellowstone herd is estimated at 4,900 making it the largest in the country.

You can somewhat judge a bison’s mood by what’s going on with its tail.  When calm, the tail hangs down and switches naturally.  Although you can never trust the mood of a bison, when that tail is straight up, it’s time to stand back and get out of its way as it may be ready to charge.

The bison can live up to 20 years with an average between 10 and 20 years.  The cows begin breeding after 2 years, the bulls after 6 years.  All bison love to wallow in the dirt but the males perform this task during mating season to leave their scent and display their strength.

Bison Butting HeadsThe ancestry can be traced back to southern Asia thousands of years ago but made their way to America crossing the land bridge connecting Asia with North America hundreds of thousands of years ago.  Then, these bison were much larger and fossil records show that a prehistoric bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

The American bison's ancestors can be traced to southern Asia thousands of years ago. Bison made their way to America, and near Louisiana, by crossing the ancient land bridge that once connected Asia with North America during the Pliocene Epoch, some 400,000 years ago. These ancient animals were much larger than the iconic bison we love today. Fossil records show that one prehistoric bison, Bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

While bison have poor eyesight, they have excellent senses of smell and hearing. Cows and calves communicate using pig-like grunts, and during mating season, bulls can be heard bellowing across long distances.

The Region and Landscape Of Louisiana

Louisiana MapLouisiana is located in the southern region of the United States. Louisiana is the 31st most extensive and the 25th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital is Baton Rouge and largest city is New Orleans. Louisiana is the only state in the U.S. with political subdivisions termed parishes, which are the local government's equivalent to counties. The largest parish by population is East Baton Rouge Parish, and the largest by land area is Plaquemines. Louisiana is bordered by Arkansas to the north, Mississippi to the east, Texas to the west, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south.

Much of the state's lands were formed from sediment washed down the Mississippi River, leaving enormous deltas and vast areas of coastal marsh and swamp.  These contain a rich southern biota; typical examples include birds such as ibis and egrets. There are also many species of tree frogs, and fish such as sturgeon and paddlefish. In more elevated areas, fire is a natural process in the landscape, and has produced extensive areas of longleaf pine forest and wet savannas. These support an exceptionally large number of plant species, including many species of orchids and carnivorous plants.  Louisiana has more Native American tribes than any other southern state, including four that are federally recognized, ten that are state recognized, and four that have not yet received recognition.

Some Louisiana urban environments have a multicultural, multilingual heritage, being so strongly influenced by a mixture of 18th-century French, Spanish, Native American, and African cultures that they are considered to be exceptional in the US. Before the American purchase of the territory in 1803, the current Louisiana State had been both a French colony and for a brief period, a Spanish one. In addition, colonists imported numerous African people as slaves in the 18th century. Many came from peoples of the same region of West Africa, thus concentrating their culture. In the post-Civil War environment, Anglo-Americans increased the pressure for Anglicization, and in 1921, English was for a time made the sole language of instruction in Louisiana schools before a policy of multilingualism was revived in 1974.  There has never been an official language in Louisiana, and the state constitution enumerates "the right of the people to preserve, foster, and promote their respective historic, linguistic, and cultural origins," whether English, French, Spanish, or otherwise.

The Geography of Louisiana

Louisiana BayouLouisiana is bordered to the west by Texas; to the north by Arkansas; to the east by the state of Mississippi; and to the south by the Gulf of Mexico. The surface of the state may properly be divided into two parts, the uplands of the north, and the alluvial along the coast.

The alluvial region includes low swamp lands, coastal marshlands and beaches, and barrier islands that cover about 20,000 square miles (52,000 km2). This area lies principally along the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi River, which traverses the state from north to south for a distance of about 600 miles (1,000 km) and empties into the Gulf of Mexico; the Red River; the Ouachita River and its branches; and other minor streams (some of which are called bayous).

The breadth of the alluvial region along the Mississippi is from 10 to 60 miles (15 to 100 km), and along the other rivers, the alluvial region averages about 10 miles (15 km) across. The Mississippi River flows along a ridge formed by its own natural deposits (known as a levee), from which the lands decline toward a river beyond at an average fall of six feet per mile (3 m/km). The alluvial lands along other streams present similar features.

The higher and contiguous hill lands of the north and northwestern part of the state have an area of more than 25,000 square miles (65,000 km2). They consist of prairie and woodlands. The elevations above sea level range from 10 feet (3 m) at the coast and swamp lands to 50 and 60 feet (15–18 m) at the prairie and alluvial lands. In the uplands and hills, the elevations rise to Driskill Mountain, the highest point in the state at only 535 feet (163 m) above sea level.

The Best Fishing Spots in Louisiana

Louisiana is one of the top fishing destinations in the entire country, some would even say the world. With ample fresh and saltwater options, there’s something for every angler in Louisiana.

Henderson Lake
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass

Caddo Lake
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish, stripers

Comey Lake
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish

Toledo BendLake Claiborne
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish, stripers

Lake Salvador
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish

Toledo Bend Reservoir
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish, stripers

Lake Pontchartrain Basin
Largemouth bass, crappie, catfish

Grand Lake
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish

Larto-Saline Complex
Largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish