Facts About The American Buffalo in Delaware

Note: The range of the Buffalo is fairly large but they may or may not be in Delaware.  If you are traveling to the western range of the Buffalo from Delaware, this information is provided for better understanding of this animal.

Rocky Mountain BuffaloIf bison reside in Delaware, they are the largest mammal and males can weigh up to 2,000 pounds and stand 6 feet tall.  The Yellowstone herd is the only location where bison have continuously lived since prehistoric times.  These herds are considered the only “pure” strain that roam the country’s grasslands and as of 2015, the population of the Yellowstone herd is estimated at 4,900 making it the largest in the country.

You can somewhat judge a bison’s mood by what’s going on with its tail.  When calm, the tail hangs down and switches naturally.  Although you can never trust the mood of a bison, when that tail is straight up, it’s time to stand back and get out of its way as it may be ready to charge.

The bison can live up to 20 years with an average between 10 and 20 years.  The cows begin breeding after 2 years, the bulls after 6 years.  All bison love to wallow in the dirt but the males perform this task during mating season to leave their scent and display their strength.

Bison Butting HeadsThe ancestry can be traced back to southern Asia thousands of years ago but made their way to America crossing the land bridge connecting Asia with North America hundreds of thousands of years ago.  Then, these bison were much larger and fossil records show that a prehistoric bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

The American bison's ancestors can be traced to southern Asia thousands of years ago. Bison made their way to America, and near Delaware, by crossing the ancient land bridge that once connected Asia with North America during the Pliocene Epoch, some 400,000 years ago. These ancient animals were much larger than the iconic bison we love today. Fossil records show that one prehistoric bison, Bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

While bison have poor eyesight, they have excellent senses of smell and hearing. Cows and calves communicate using pig-like grunts, and during mating season, bulls can be heard bellowing across long distances.

The Region and Landscape Of Delaware

Dover Legislative BuildingDelaware is a state located in the Mid-Atlantic and/or Northeastern regions of the United States.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the northeast by New Jersey, and to the north by Pennsylvania. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.

Delaware  occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula and is the second smallest, the sixth least populous, but the sixth most densely populated of the 50 United States. Delaware is divided into three counties, the lowest number of counties of any state. From north to south, the three counties are New Castle, Kent, and Sussex. While the southern two counties have historically been predominantly agricultural, New Castle County has been more industrialized.

Before its coastline was explored by Europeans in the 16th century, Delaware was inhabited by several groups of Native Americans, including the Lenape in the north and Nanticoke in the south. It was initially colonized by Dutch traders at Zwaanendael, near the present town of Lewes, in 1631.  Delaware was one of the 13 colonies participating in the American Revolution. On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, and has since promoted itself as "The First State".

The Geography of Delaware

Delaware and Hudson CanalDelaware is 96 miles (154 km) long and ranges from 9 miles (14 km) to 35 miles (56 km) across, totaling 1,954 square miles (5,060 km2), making it the second-smallest state in the United States after Rhode Island. Delaware is bounded to the north by Pennsylvania; to the east by the Delaware River, Delaware Bay, New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean; and to the west and south by Maryland. Small portions of Delaware are also situated on the eastern side of the Delaware River sharing land boundaries with New Jersey. The state of Delaware, together with the Eastern Shore counties of Maryland and two counties of Virginia, form the Delmarva Peninsula, which stretches down the Mid-Atlantic Coast.

The definition of the northern boundary of the state is unusual. Most of the boundary between Delaware and Pennsylvania was originally defined by an arc extending 12 miles (19.3 km) from the cupola of the courthouse in the city of New Castle.[citation needed] This boundary is often referred to as the Twelve-Mile Circle.[b] This is the only nominally circular state boundary in the United States.

This border extends all the way east to the low-tide mark on the New Jersey shore, then continues south along the shoreline until it again reaches the 12-mile (19 km) arc in the south; then the boundary continues in a more conventional way in the middle of the main channel (thalweg) of the Delaware River. To the west, a portion of the arc extends past the easternmost edge of Maryland. The remaining western border runs slightly east of due south from its intersection with the arc. The Wedge of land between the northwest part of the arc and the Maryland border was claimed by both Delaware and Pennsylvania until 1921, when Delaware's claim was confirmed.

The Top Fishing Spots in Delaware

Delaware offers a variety of fishing including Catfish, Crappie, Walleye, Trout, Sunfish, Stripers and the following bodies of water have good to great Largemouth Bass Fishing:

Andrews Lake
Becks Pond
Betts Pond
Chipman Pond
Concord Pond
Coursey Pond
Garrisons Lake
Griffiths Lake
Haven Lake
Hearns Pond
Horsey Pond
Ingrams Pond
Lums Pond
Mill Pond
McGinnis Pond
Millsboro Pond
Moores Lake
Mud Mill Pond
Records Pond
Silver Lake
Wagamons Pond
Waples Pond

Pick Your City in DE
  1. Dover (DE)
  2. Wilminton (DE)