Facts About The American Buffalo in Arkansas

Note: The range of the Buffalo is fairly large but they may or may not be in Arkansas.  If you are traveling to the western range of the Buffalo from Arkansas, this information is provided for better understanding of this animal.

Rocky Mountain BuffaloIf bison reside in Arkansas, they are the largest mammal and males can weigh up to 2,000 pounds and stand 6 feet tall.  The Yellowstone herd is the only location where bison have continuously lived since prehistoric times.  These herds are considered the only “pure” strain that roam the country’s grasslands and as of 2015, the population of the Yellowstone herd is estimated at 4,900 making it the largest in the country.

You can somewhat judge a bison’s mood by what’s going on with its tail.  When calm, the tail hangs down and switches naturally.  Although you can never trust the mood of a bison, when that tail is straight up, it’s time to stand back and get out of its way as it may be ready to charge.

The bison can live up to 20 years with an average between 10 and 20 years.  The cows begin breeding after 2 years, the bulls after 6 years.  All bison love to wallow in the dirt but the males perform this task during mating season to leave their scent and display their strength.

Bison Butting HeadsThe ancestry can be traced back to southern Asia thousands of years ago but made their way to America crossing the land bridge connecting Asia with North America hundreds of thousands of years ago.  Then, these bison were much larger and fossil records show that a prehistoric bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

The American bison's ancestors can be traced to southern Asia thousands of years ago. Bison made their way to America, and near Arkansas, by crossing the ancient land bridge that once connected Asia with North America during the Pliocene Epoch, some 400,000 years ago. These ancient animals were much larger than the iconic bison we love today. Fossil records show that one prehistoric bison, Bison had horns measuring 9 feet from tip to tip.

While bison have poor eyesight, they have excellent senses of smell and hearing. Cows and calves communicate using pig-like grunts, and during mating season, bulls can be heard bellowing across long distances.

The Region and Landscape Of Arkansas

Little Rock Arkansas SkylineArkansas is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States.  Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians.  The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Arkansas is the 29th largest by area and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government. The northwestern corner of the state, such as the Fayetteville–Springdale–Rogers Metropolitan Area and Fort Smith metropolitan area, is a population, education, and economic center. The largest city in the eastern part of the state is Jonesboro. The largest city in the southeastern part of the state is Pine Bluff.

The Territory of Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836.  Arkansas withdrew from the United States and joined the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. Upon returning to the Union, the state would continue to suffer due to its earlier reliance on slavery and the plantation economy, causing the state to fall behind economically and socially. White rural interests continued to dominate the state's politics until the Civil Rights movement in the mid-20th century. Arkansas began to diversify its economy following World War II and relies on its service industry, aircraft, poultry, steel, tourism, cotton, and rice.

The Geography of Arkansas

Buffalo RiverArkansas can generally be split into two halves, the highlands in the northwest half and the lowlands of the southeastern half.  The highlands are part of the Southern Interior Highlands, including The Ozarks and the Ouachita Mountains. The southern lowlands include the Gulf Coastal Plain and the Arkansas Delta.  This dual split can yield to general regions named northwest, southwest, northeast, southeast, or central Arkansas. These directionally named regions are broad and not defined along county lines. Arkansas has seven distinct natural regions: the Ozark Mountains, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas River Valley, Gulf Coastal Plain, Crowley's Ridge, and the Arkansas Delta, with Central Arkansas sometimes included as a blend of multiple regions.

The southeastern part of Arkansas along the Mississippi Alluvial Plain is sometimes called the Arkansas Delta. This region is a flat landscape of rich alluvial soils formed by repeated flooding of the adjacent Mississippi. Farther away from the river, in the southeast portion of the state, the Grand Prairie consists of a more undulating landscape. Both are fertile agricultural areas. The Delta region is bisected by a geological formation known as Crowley's Ridge. A narrow band of rolling hills, Crowley's Ridge rises from 250 to 500 feet (76 to 152 m) above the surrounding alluvial plain and underlies many of the major towns of eastern Arkansas.

Northwest Arkansas is part of the Ozark Plateau including the Ozark Mountains, to the south are the Ouachita Mountains, and these regions are divided by the Arkansas River; the southern and eastern parts of Arkansas are called the Lowlands.  These mountain ranges are part of the U.S. Interior Highlands region, the only major mountainous region between the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains.  The highest point in the state is Mount Magazine in the Ouachita Mountains, which rises to 2,753 feet (839 m) above sea level.

The Top Fishing Spots in Arkansas

BEAVER LAKE
smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, and striper bass

TABLE ROCK LAKE
Trout, crappie, catfish, largemouth bass, striped bass and white bass

BULL SHOALS LAKE
Largemouth bass, rainbow, brown and cutthroat trout

WHITE RIVER OXBOWS
Largemouth bass, catfish, crappie and bream

ARKANSAS RIVER
Largemouth bass, crappie, catfish, stripers and bream

LAKE MAUMELLE
White bass, largemouth bass, spotted bass, crappie, bream, channel catfish, blue catfish

LAKE CHARLES
Largemouth bass, crappie, bream and catfish

LAKE OUACHITA
Largemouth Bass, Spotted Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Striped Bass, White Bass, Channel Catfish, Blue Catfish, Flathead Catfish, Redear Sunfish, Bluegill, Crappie and Walleye

LITTLE MAUMELLE RIVER
Largemouth bass, spotted bass, white bass, black crappie, white crappie, bream, channel catfish, blue catfish and flathead catfish

Pick Your City in AR