Congressman Chris Stewart of Utah on BLM 2.0

BLM 2.0

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressional Western Caucus Chairman Paul A. Gosar D.D.S. (AZ-04), Executive Vice-Chairman Scott Tipton (CO-03) and Western Caucus Members Congresswoman Liz Cheney (WY-At Large), Congresswoman Mia Love (UT-04), Congressman Raúl Labrador (ID-01) and Congressman Chris Stewart (UT-02) released the following statements after the House successfully passed H.J. Res. 44 by a recorded bipartisan vote of 234-186, legislation which seeks to block the rule submitted by the Bureau of Land Management commonly known as Planning 2.0:

CHRIS STEWART
Cong Chris Stewart Utah“The BLM’s final rule, known as Planning 2.0, is a snapshot of everything that was wrong with the previous administration. Unfortunately, this rule is so flawed, that a couple of administrative fixes will not right the ship. It has to be rescinded. The final rule ignored thousands of comments submitted from states and county commissioners and moved decision making out of the hands of local officials and into the hands of DC bureaucrats. These bureaucrats simply don’t know the land and needs of the counties like local officials do,” said Congressman Stewart.

BACKGROUND

On December 12, 2016 the Obama Administration published another overreaching “midnight regulation” in the form of the BLM’s new Resource Management Rule, commonly referred to as BLM’s Planning 2.0 Rule.

The same day the final rule was published, six Western states and a conservation district filed suit to block the new regulation stating that Planning 2.0 “will severely impair their ability to work with the BLM on future planning and management issues.”

H.J. Res 44, a joint resolution introduced by Rep. Liz Cheney (WY-At Large), utilizes the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to disapprove and nullify BLM’s Planning 2.0 Rule.
The Congressional Review Act, a law enacted in 1996, requires a simple majority in both Houses as well as a signature by the president and uses expedited procedures that allow for nullification of an entire regulation through a joint resolution that cannot be filibustered. The CRA prevents the rule from continuing in effect and also prevents a substantially similar rule from being reissued. The parliamentarian has advised that all rules submitted during the 114th Congress on or after June 13, 2016, are eligible for review under the Congressional Review Act.

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