Tactics And Methods For Tuna Fishing from the New Mexico area

General Tactics And Methods when fishing for Tuna from the New Mexico area include trolling with feathered jigs, spoons and lures; live bait fishing with sardines, squid, anchovies, sardines and other small fishes.

Line Test Is The Backbone Of Success in Tuna Fishing when from the New Mexico area

The Blue Fin, Yellow Fin, Albacore and the Yellow Tail are considered by anglers to be an excellent light tackle game fish. Light tackle is reasonable with fish under 40lbs.  Dock counts can suggest the tackle required but anything higher than 40lbs should push you to a heavier tackle approach.  The sound most often heard on deck is “Pop”, the line just broke and the angler is left speechless.  A minimum of 40lb test is considered light tackle.  Heavier line test is required for the giants.

What Are The Preferred Lure Colors from the New Mexico area

Prefered Lures and ColorsAt “gray light” or “dawn’s early light”, or during clouded or overcast conditions, trolling jigs or feathers or deep diving crank type baits i.e. Rapala Magnum 18 or 20’ are essential. Stay with the combination of dark purple with black strips, dark blue & black.

In swim baits, use purple or dark blue belly and a black back.  from the New Mexico area, the most common denominator is using dark colors in dark or low light conditions. As the light becomes more bright and or the cloud cover burns off, transfer to lighter colors, pale greens, blues, silver or gray. The preference is something along the lines of a white bellied swim bait with pale green sides and a brown back, the basic anchovy pattern. If your lure has eyes, great.  If they don’t, then purchase the 3D clear silver with black pupil.   Eyes come in various sizes but don’t depend on the self adhesive kind.  Use Super Glue!

It is not recommended to use red eyes.  When fishing with live bait, anchovy, sardines, mackerel and the like, you need to keep fresh bait in the water for not more than a minute, two at the max. If that bait has a bloody nose or red eyes, pop it off and hook up a new one. Lures that look like their already wounded are ignored.  Live bait is preferred and yields more results but you’re changing out bait often.  Less hassle is required when using artificial baits and the preference is a triangular jig with factory 3D silver/black eyes from the factory, ¾ to1.5 ounces.

The Right Rod And Tips For Tuna Fishing from the New Mexico area

Saltwater Baitcasting ReelFor light tackle situations in in the New Mexico area, trolling rigs on the sport charters are adequate with preference on the spoon or jig rod 6’6’- 7’-6” med-hvy action with a fast tip for jig casting and retrieval. Spool up with 40 lbs test. Jig color of choice in chrome and blue, blue and white with heavy wire hooks. This technique is affecting fishing in and around islands, rock piles and ledges.

“Paddy Hopping” it probably one of the more techniques using the soft plastic replaceable swim bait bodies on ¾” oz triangular jig head with 3D eyes. The bodies in the brown back, green and white belly in an anchovy pattern is always first choice bait, black back transparent green or blue with silver flake or a black back and purple body are also productive. Charter boats in the New Mexico area almost always will pass a kelp paddy on the port side. Paying attention to the boat position and listen to the deck hands and captain will yield bounty. Be sure to communicate with deck hands on what to anticipate.

If you’re in to really having fun, use your Bass Rod with 20 lbs test. This is an excellent choice when pounding the “Paddy’s”. The Bass Rod lends itself to more surgical casts and plenty of fighting ability; you’ll fight the fish instead of horsing to the boat gaff. Play the fish since you’re not being charged by the hour. Keep their noses up, if they drop the nose you’re losing control of your fish. And when you first “color” your fish coming to the boat, control your excitement and hang on for one more run away from boat, then when you see it the second time, yell “Color or Gaff” to get your deck hand involved. Remember with all species, the bigger the fish the more runs away from the boat they’ll make. With a 50-60 pound Blue Fin count on at least four runs, if you get in on the third great. Now this doesn’t apply to trolling fish caught on heavy jigs on feathers with 80-100 test line in New Mexico. Horse the fish to the boat, get them on deck and bait or lure back in the water.

Saltwater RodsAnother favorite lure fishing technique is called fishing the “Slide”. This technique replaces the 5 ½ inch replaceable swim bait with a 1.5 ounce lead jig head with silver/black 3D eyes. Fish with 60 pound test braid and a heavy stainless steel swivel to let the bait swim and when it’s really tough a fluorocarbon 3 foot leader. So while the boat is in trolling rotation, have your rod in hand and when “Hook Up” is hollered out on the trollers.  Then quickly take your spot in the Port corner of the fantail and free spool the swim bait to meet the incoming school of fish that are coming to the boat while the boat has throttled back. Your swim bait will get bit while the bait guys are elbow deep in the live well trying to catch a lively bait, which should be sport all its own. This method works well because you can put the first lure in the water column to meet the school.

And one more thing you need to know, in the summer months the tuna will hit top water poppers, how fun is that? 7-10” poppers, throw them on 80lb braid. You’ll be amazed at what will surface to strike.

Reference Links:

Kinston Lures

Tackle Direct

New Mexico’s state constitution states: “No law shall abridge the right of the citizen to keep and bear arms for security and defense, for lawful hunting and recreational use and for other lawful purposes, but nothing herein shall be held to permit the carrying of concealed weapons. No municipality or county shall regulate, in any way, an incident of the right to keep and bear arms.”

New Mexico has state preemption of firearms laws, so local governments may not restrict the possession or use of firearms. In 1986, Article 2, Section 6 of the state constitution was amended to say, "No law shall abridge the right of the citizen to keep and bear arms for security and defense, for lawful hunting and recreational use and for other lawful purposes, but nothing herein shall be held to permit the carrying of concealed weapons. No municipality or county shall regulate, in any way, an incident of the right to keep and bear arms."

New Mexico is a "shall issue" state for the concealed carry of handguns, and permits the open carry of loaded firearms. An applicant for a concealed carry permit must be a resident of New Mexico and at least 21 years of age. Each permit specifies the category and caliber of handgun that may be carried, but is also valid for a smaller caliber. The applicant must complete a state approved training course that includes at least 15 hours of classroom and firing range time, and must pass a shooting proficiency test for that category and caliber of handgun. A permit is valid for four years, but license holders must pass the shooting proficiency test every two years.

When it comes to gun control advocates in New Mexico they sometimes forget the state is largely rural state, where old Hispanic families have hunted, ranched and farmed the mountain valleys and mesas since Spanish settlers first arrived in the 1500s, efforts to restrict firearms have been viewed warily. New Mexico is a place where you can bring your gun almost anywhere. You can even carry your weapon openly in the Capitol, if you wish — one of only a few states that allow open or concealed carry in their statehouses.

New Mexico does not have a law based on the castle doctrine, per se. However, the state’s self-defense statute does not require victims to retreat when they or their property come under attack. The law, which has been on the books since 1907, is somewhat vague. Courts have held in past rulings that deadly force must be merited; in other words, a landowner cannot justifiably shoot someone merely for trespassing on his property.

New Mexico, with its Wild West history, is not known as a hotbed of anti-gun sentiment. So the fate of a new legislative proposal to close the infamous "gun show loophole," that exempts from background checks people who buy guns from "private sellers" as opposed to licensed gun dealers, may be an interesting bellwether for the fate of such legislation in Washington.

New Mexico does not require a concealed weapons permit if an individual has a similar carrying permit of the following states: Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Wyoming.

If a concealed weapons permit is valid, an individual will still face a few restrictions on where he/she is allowed to carry a handgun; these places include: Any federal buildings, schools, or restaurants that serve alcohol. Concealed carry laws in New Mexico are complex and detailed in regards to locations that sell alcohol. For instance, it is legal to carry concealed weapons in grocery stores or convenient stores that sell alcohol, but considered illegal if carried into a liquor store.

New Mexico law allows a person to have a concealed loaded firearm in his or her vehicle (including motorcycles and bicycles). If you are not licensed to carry concealed in this State, you may not have the weapon concealed on your person when you exit your vehicle or motorcycle.

New Mexico is an Open Carry State, meaning it is legal to carry a loaded weapon as long as it is not concealed. However, it is not legal to carry any firearm in any federal building, school, state building, or licensed liquor establishment. It is the responsibility of the person carrying the firearm to be informed as to when and where carrying is prohibited.

Pursuant to Subsection C of NMSA 1978 Section 29-19-12, any person lawfully in possession of private property may prohibit the carrying of concealed handguns on such private property by posting notice in accordance with NMSA 1978 Section 30-14-6 or by verbally notifying persons entering upon the property. Learn more about New Mexico’s CCW laws on our website, US Precision Defense