Tactics And Methods For Tuna Fishing from the Colorado area

General Tactics And Methods when fishing for Tuna from the Colorado area include trolling with feathered jigs, spoons and lures; live bait fishing with sardines, squid, anchovies, sardines and other small fishes.

Line Test Is The Backbone Of Success in Tuna Fishing when from the Colorado area

The Blue Fin, Yellow Fin, Albacore and the Yellow Tail are considered by anglers to be an excellent light tackle game fish. Light tackle is reasonable with fish under 40lbs.  Dock counts can suggest the tackle required but anything higher than 40lbs should push you to a heavier tackle approach.  The sound most often heard on deck is “Pop”, the line just broke and the angler is left speechless.  A minimum of 40lb test is considered light tackle.  Heavier line test is required for the giants.

What Are The Preferred Lure Colors from the Colorado area

Prefered Lures and ColorsAt “gray light” or “dawn’s early light”, or during clouded or overcast conditions, trolling jigs or feathers or deep diving crank type baits i.e. Rapala Magnum 18 or 20’ are essential. Stay with the combination of dark purple with black strips, dark blue & black.

In swim baits, use purple or dark blue belly and a black back.  from the Colorado area, the most common denominator is using dark colors in dark or low light conditions. As the light becomes more bright and or the cloud cover burns off, transfer to lighter colors, pale greens, blues, silver or gray. The preference is something along the lines of a white bellied swim bait with pale green sides and a brown back, the basic anchovy pattern. If your lure has eyes, great.  If they don’t, then purchase the 3D clear silver with black pupil.   Eyes come in various sizes but don’t depend on the self adhesive kind.  Use Super Glue!

It is not recommended to use red eyes.  When fishing with live bait, anchovy, sardines, mackerel and the like, you need to keep fresh bait in the water for not more than a minute, two at the max. If that bait has a bloody nose or red eyes, pop it off and hook up a new one. Lures that look like their already wounded are ignored.  Live bait is preferred and yields more results but you’re changing out bait often.  Less hassle is required when using artificial baits and the preference is a triangular jig with factory 3D silver/black eyes from the factory, ¾ to1.5 ounces.

The Right Rod And Tips For Tuna Fishing from the Colorado area

Saltwater Baitcasting ReelFor light tackle situations in in the Colorado area, trolling rigs on the sport charters are adequate with preference on the spoon or jig rod 6’6’- 7’-6” med-hvy action with a fast tip for jig casting and retrieval. Spool up with 40 lbs test. Jig color of choice in chrome and blue, blue and white with heavy wire hooks. This technique is affecting fishing in and around islands, rock piles and ledges.

“Paddy Hopping” it probably one of the more techniques using the soft plastic replaceable swim bait bodies on ¾” oz triangular jig head with 3D eyes. The bodies in the brown back, green and white belly in an anchovy pattern is always first choice bait, black back transparent green or blue with silver flake or a black back and purple body are also productive. Charter boats in the Colorado area almost always will pass a kelp paddy on the port side. Paying attention to the boat position and listen to the deck hands and captain will yield bounty. Be sure to communicate with deck hands on what to anticipate.

If you’re in to really having fun, use your Bass Rod with 20 lbs test. This is an excellent choice when pounding the “Paddy’s”. The Bass Rod lends itself to more surgical casts and plenty of fighting ability; you’ll fight the fish instead of horsing to the boat gaff. Play the fish since you’re not being charged by the hour. Keep their noses up, if they drop the nose you’re losing control of your fish. And when you first “color” your fish coming to the boat, control your excitement and hang on for one more run away from boat, then when you see it the second time, yell “Color or Gaff” to get your deck hand involved. Remember with all species, the bigger the fish the more runs away from the boat they’ll make. With a 50-60 pound Blue Fin count on at least four runs, if you get in on the third great. Now this doesn’t apply to trolling fish caught on heavy jigs on feathers with 80-100 test line in Colorado. Horse the fish to the boat, get them on deck and bait or lure back in the water.

Saltwater RodsAnother favorite lure fishing technique is called fishing the “Slide”. This technique replaces the 5 ½ inch replaceable swim bait with a 1.5 ounce lead jig head with silver/black 3D eyes. Fish with 60 pound test braid and a heavy stainless steel swivel to let the bait swim and when it’s really tough a fluorocarbon 3 foot leader. So while the boat is in trolling rotation, have your rod in hand and when “Hook Up” is hollered out on the trollers.  Then quickly take your spot in the Port corner of the fantail and free spool the swim bait to meet the incoming school of fish that are coming to the boat while the boat has throttled back. Your swim bait will get bit while the bait guys are elbow deep in the live well trying to catch a lively bait, which should be sport all its own. This method works well because you can put the first lure in the water column to meet the school.

And one more thing you need to know, in the summer months the tuna will hit top water poppers, how fun is that? 7-10” poppers, throw them on 80lb braid. You’ll be amazed at what will surface to strike.

Reference Links:

Kinston Lures

Tackle Direct

The Region and Landscape Of Colorado

TellurideColorado is a state in the United States encompassing most of the Southern Rocky Mountains as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. Colorado is part of the Western United States, the Southwestern United States, and the Mountain States. Colorado is the 8th most extensive and the 22nd most populous of the 50 United States. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Colorado was 5,456,574 on July 1, 2015, an increase of 8.50% since the 2010 United States Census.

The state was named for the Colorado River, which Spanish travelers named the Río Colorado for the ruddy (Spanish: colorado) silt the river carried from the mountains. The Territory of Colorado was organized on February 28, 1861, and on August 1, 1876, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed Proclamation 230 admitting Colorado to the Union as the 38th state. Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State" because it became a state in the same year as the centennial of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Colorado is bordered by Wyoming to the north, Nebraska to the northeast, Kansas to the east, Oklahoma to the southeast, New Mexico to the south, Utah to the west, and Arizona to the southwest at the Four Corners. Colorado is noted for its vivid landscape of mountains, forests, high plains, mesas, canyons, plateaus, rivers, and desert lands.

The Geography of Colorado

Animas RiverColorado is notable for its diverse geography, ranging from alpine mountains, arid plains and deserts with huge sand dunes, deep canyons, sandstone and granite rock formations, rivers, lakes, and lush forests. The borders of Colorado were originally defined to be lines of latitude and longitude, making its shape a latitude-longitude quadrangle which stretches from 37°N to 41°N latitude and from 102°03'W to 109°03'W longitude (25°W to 32°W from the Washington Meridian).  Colorado, Wyoming and Utah are the only states which have boundaries defined solely by lines of latitude and longitude.

The summit of Mount Elbert at 14,440 feet (4,401.2 m) elevation in Lake County is the highest point in Colorado and the Rocky Mountains of North America.  Colorado is the only U.S. state that lies entirely above 1,000 meters elevation. The point where the Arikaree River flows out of Yuma County, Colorado, and into Cheyenne County, Kansas, is the lowest point in Colorado at 3,317 feet (1,011 m) elevation. This point, which holds the distinction of being the highest low elevation point of any state, is higher than the high elevation points of 18 states and the District of Columbia.

Rocky Mountain Natl ParkA little less than one half of the area of Colorado is flat and rolling land. East of the Rocky Mountains are the Colorado Eastern Plains of the High Plains, the section of the Great Plains within Nebraska at elevations ranging from roughly 3,350 to 7,500 feet (1,020 to 2,290 m).  The Colorado plains are usually thought of as prairies, but actually they have many patches of deciduous forests, buttes, and canyons, much like the high plains in New Mexico as well. Eastern Colorado is presently mainly covered in farmland, along with small farming villages and towns. Precipitation is fair, averaging from 15 to 25 inches (380 to 640 mm) annually.  Corn, wheat, hay, soybeans, and oats are all typical crops, and most of the villages and towns in this region boast both a water tower and a grain elevator. As well as the farming of crops, Eastern Colorado has a good deal of livestock raising, such as at cattle ranches and hog farms and irrigation water is available from the South Platte, the Arkansas River, and a few other streams, and also from subterranean sources, including artesian wells. However, heavy use of ground water from wells for irrigation has caused underground water reserves to decline.

The Top Fishing Spots in Colorado

The Animas River
Trophy Trout

Gore Creek
Brook, Cutthroat, Rainbow and Brown Trout

North Platte River
The Colorado section can only be accessed with a raft or kayak and has some of the best wild trout fishing in the West.

The Frying Pan River
Trophy Rainbow Trout

Roaring Fork
Trophy Trout

The South Platte River
Trout

North Delaney Lake
Trout

The Gunnison River
Trophy Trout

Rio Grande
Rainbow and Brown Trout

Spinney Mountain Reservoir
Trophy rainbows, cutthroat and brown Trout.

Blue River
Trophy Trout